Take 2: Adult Leggings Pattern (free)

I’ve received so many kind messages about my last post; a children’s leggings pattern and tutorial on how to make leggings or footless tights.  I also included directions on how to make a pattern for adult-sized leggings but stopped short of a pattern.

This week I made a pair for myself, as I’ll need them for our upcoming trip to Central America.  Why not create a pattern and share it with you?  The fabric is black/silver spandex – nylon and spandex or lycra, I think.  Since there was more stretch with the grain, I cut across the grain.  That is, the selvage ran across the top of the tights.

Leggings Pattern sz med pdf

First of all, here is the pattern, which is for an adult size medium.  This is “low tech” pattern making with hand written instructions.  All you need to do is to print the 10 pages in the Adult Leggings Pattern sz med pdf and tape them together following the grid on page 1 of the pattern.

Sizing Tips:

  1. In order to fit well and stay up, the hip size of the finished leggings is about 2/3 of my actual size.  The finished hip circumference is 28″ and my actual measurement is 40″.
  2. The legs are closer to my actual size.  At the top of the inseam, the finished leggings are 18″ circumference against my actual size of about 22″.
  3. At the ankle, the leggings circumference is 7 3/4″ against an actual ankle measurement of 8″.
  4. Length – my leggings inseam is 27″ which is 1″ shorter than my pants inseam.  You may need to lengthen the pattern as most of the world is taller than I am.  That’s just how it is!

If you need to alter the pattern, make a split down the middle of the pattern, which would be at the side seam (if there was a side seam).  As you can see from my’m hoping this will give you an idea of how much to split the pattern.  The nice thing about using lycra or spandex is that it’s forgiving and your measurements don’t need to be exact.

What about the Elastic?

As with children’s leggings, apply the elastic with a zig-zag stitch.  Pull the elastic so it is slightly smaller than the top of the tights.

Here are several more photos of the completed project – these are incredibly comfortable to wear and will be just what I need for our upcoming trip – they will double as tights, long underwear and maybe PJ’s too.

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Free Child’s Crinoline Pattern

One of the fascinating things about a blog is taking a peek behind the scenes of a website.  As the blog owner I have regular access to the type of searches and other sites which refer users to the blog.  For me, this experience provides the same level of intrigue as other “back stage” experiences; maybe like being in a cockpit of a plane or in a production studio.

You Asked: Free Crinoline Pattern


For me, a peak into the wonders of the internet revealed that the most common word searches for my blog are submitted by sewists seeking a (free) crinoline pattern for under a child’s dress or a wedding dress.  About six months ago, I posted a brief tutorial for a wedding dress crinoline, which is what the search engines are targeting.  I understand why that posting gets a lot of hits, because when I tried to find a free crinoline pattern online, I struck out – hence the reason for the post.

Last week as my good friend Barb, was making a flower girl dress for her granddaughter, she asked me for directions on how to make a child’s crinoline.  That request reminded me that I’d started this post a long time ago.  Because of the number of photos and the length of the text, this would have been a really boring and long blog post.  Instead I put the instructions and photos into a really long and boring document.  This is hardly high fashion, but it’s a try at writing instructions.  Now I understand why there are so many patterns which are poorly written – It’s really tough to describe how to sew a garment, even with a lot of photos.

Click below to open the pdf:

Childs Crinoline Pattern

Please leave a comment with feedback on whether this give you the needed information.  Enjoy!





The Joy of Having a Grandmother who Sews

Laura Ingalls Bonnet Tutorial

Several weeks ago Angela and Stephen took our granddaughters on a trip to Yellowstone and the Grand Tetons.  From the photos and stories, it appears that one of the delights was living in a rustic cabin.  This experience brought to life the stories of Laura Ingalls Wilder.  It sounds as if they played the part in every possible way.

Here’s an account of our first phone call after they arrived home:

Caitlin:  “Ramma (that’s Grandma), can you make me a Laura Ingalls bonnet?  And one for Mira too?”

Me: “I’m sure I can, I’ll just need to find a pattern.”

Caitlin: “Ramma, I want mine to be brown calico with little dots on it.”

Me:  “I’m not sure if I have any fabric like that, but when you come to visit for Uncle Shaun’s wedding, you can see if there is some other fabric you might like me to use.”

Caitlin: “Well I want it to be brown calico with little dots.”

Me:  “OK, I’ll see what I can do.”

Caitlin:  “If you don’t have fabric with dots on it, I know how to sew and I can help to sew the dots on the fabric.”

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Now that’s a girl who believes anything is possible and will do what is needed to get the desired result!

When Catie and Mira came to visit, they eagerly went through my 3×5 fabric swatch cards.  Based on my guidance on what type of fabric would be appropriate for a bonnet, they touched and stretched the fabric swatches and sorted the cards into piles.  In case you’d like the same direction, I told them the fabric couldn’t be stretchy like a T-shirt or shiny like for a party dress.  It worked.

After careful consideration each of them made a selection.  Catie’s wasn’t brown (no surprise here because I never purchase brown fabric) but it had dots on it.  Whew, we didn’t need to sew on all of those little dots!

As I’m sure you would do, I searched the internet for a free pattern or tutorial and found this great Laura Ingalls Wilder Bonnet Tutorial which spared me a trip to a fabric store.

Mira's bonnet

Tutorial Additions:

If you decide to make a bonnet such as this, here are a few changes which I would  whole heartedly recommend.

  1. Add 3/4″ to the length of the crown piece (will be 17-3/4″ long) to make an elastic casing.
  2. Fold the casing and sew in place.
  3. Run an 8″ piece of elastic through the casing and secure the ends.
  4. Now sew the brim to the crown.
  5. On the side which will be attached to the crown, cut the interfacing 1/2″shorter than the brim pieces.  This allows you to fold the fabric over the interfacing when attaching the brim to the crown and reduces bulk.
  6. Top stitch the edge of the brim – it gives a nice finished look.

Caitlin's bonnet

So in the end, it’s not brown calico with hand-sewn dots, but the bonnets sure are cute.  They’re off in the mail and I can’t wait to see photos of the girls who will likely wear them when their parents lovingly read them the Laura Ingalls stories.  What a joy it is to create treasures and hopefully “grandmother memories” such as this.